Guiding Principles

When crafting this survey, ARC3 was guided by the following principles:

  • Inclusiveness, mutual respect, and collaboration
    • Where the voices of researchers, college and university administrators, and students will all be heard
  • Engaging in an iterative and transparent drafting process
    • The authors invite and encourage peer review and revision of the survey.
    • Administrators should give support, feedback and consultation to researchers so that the survey will be as useful and relevant as possible.
    • Scientists in turn should consider the feedback in developing a survey that meets institutional needs
  • Ensuring independence and integrity in research
    • Guided by the ethics of science and recognizing and taking steps to remove the influence of bias
    • A commitment to use of the best scientific evidence as the foundation of the survey
    • There is a scientific knowledge base and a transparent scientific process must guide this work if the research is to have integrity and accuracy
    • Peer reviewed studies are the basis for determining survey content
  • Equal focus on surveying victimization and perpetration
    • Meaningful prevention rests on identifying the reasons sexual misconduct is perpetrated and the environments that foster it. Data that are focused on both victimization and perpetration creates a scientific foundation for administrative work.
  • The adoption of a civil rights approach grounded in Title IX
    • Our work focuses on the range of acts that constitute student on student incidents an institution must respond to and process under guidelines of Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, the Clery Law and other applicable local, state, and federal law and guidelines
  • Framing our efforts with the principles of The Belmont Report
    • Respect for persons: Ensure that students are informed and participate voluntarily
    • Beneficence: Participation in a campus climate survey is an educational opportunity and an intervention
  • Justice
    • As stated in the Belmont report, address “Who ought to receive the benefits of research and bear its burdens?”
  • A sensitivity to the unique issues faced by various diverse populations and higher education institutional types
    • Addressing the intersectionality of identities and the multiple contextual factors affecting risk